Monthly Archives: August 2012

DOMINO Program September

Hello, here´s a DOMINO program for September – Is suppose also other things will take place…what do you say? yours br Björn
 
SUNDAY Sep 2nd                      -Coming Masses: Oct 14th, Nov 4th, Dec 9th
Student Sunday Mas
s
4.30 pm
Join for Song exercise  at 3.30.
Mass is followed by a meal. Bring things we share together
After the meal, at 7.15:
FILM and Discussion at 7.15, Ghost Dog by Jim Jarmusch, USA 1999
Jim Jarmusch has come up with something strange and amazing in “Ghost Dog”– an existential fable. Original indie-hipster Jim Jarmusch (“Strasnger than Paradise,”Down By Law”) seems to be well outside his usual territory here, yet “Ghost Dog” not only hangs together, it’s original, sharply funny, and rather moving. An ancient samurai code, embodied by Forest Whitaker as a lone hitman, runs smack into mob family values in this modern urban battleground.
 
TUESDAY even weeks (34,36…) -Sep 4th, 18th
Prayer in the spirit of Taizé

7.30 pm
Gathering with program afterwards.
Look at taize.fr about Taizé and their prayers.
WEDNESDAYS
Mass followed by lunch
12.10 pm
Sign in for preparing on the list attached on the fridge at Sandgatan.
 

TORSDAGAR ojämna veckor  -start 30 aug, 13 sep, 27 sep
kl 17.15
Tema och fika
Lära känna katolsk tro – nu några gånger om bönen, vad det innebär, och olika böneformer.

Also:
 
FRIDAY Sep 21st
FILM DAY
– two films and dinner between.
4 pm –          The Passion of Anna, Ingemar Bergman, Sweden 1969 96 min
A less-known Bergman movie, yet among his most alluring. Andreas Winkelman (played by Bergman favourite Max von Sydow) moves to a barren island, in grief of his recently deceased wife. He befriends his neighbours, the widow Anna (Liv Ullman) and a married couple (Bibi Andersson and Erland Josephson). The island, as well as its inhabitants, keeps many threatening secrets.
                            Mealbring things for the table!
7.30 pm   –   My Night at Maud´s, Eric Rohmer, France 1969, 110 min
…where the Catholic Jean-Louis (played by New Wave favourite Jean-Louis Trintignant) spends a night talking with the Marxist Vidal (Antoine Vitez) and the libertine divorcee Maud (Françoise Fabian) on topics on morality, religion, philosophy, mathematics. Jean-Louis and Maud are finally left on their own…                             Discussion afterwardsAbout Ingemar Bergman and Eric Rohmer on: https://dominolund.wordpress.com/2012/08/22/filmprogram-for-this-autumn/
 
SATURDAY Sep 15th
morning-4.30?
Walking excursion
Some hours together walking in nature, taking bus there, bringing picnic.
-info will follow.
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Istanbul Stories 3

Here are some more stories trom our trip to Istanbul in June…  A travel with many subjects, but basically about: Us as Christians from Western Europe, meeting with other people, different from us in traditions, religion, history.
We prepared the trip since September last year (9 month for this baby to be born…) with conferences on Byzantine life, Turkish mosques, Alevi (islamic religious minority) prayers, with dinners and films, seminars on texts we read and prepared for each others: byzantine and ottoman history, turkish culture, religous life and social and political situation.

“What struck me particularly during our visit to the city centre of Istanbul was what could be called some kind of ”rural friendliness”, two words one would not intuitively apply to a city of nearly 20 million inhabitants.
Rural, in the way that the city centre seems to be composed of many distinct neighbourhoods where time seems to follow the pace of quiet, self-contained village life. Beyond the busy and sometimes chaotic boulevards – graceful only by name – you will find elderly men taking their time in the local eatery or outside the mosque, craftsmen in their open workshops, women chatting in the streets with their children playing nearby and occasional poultry taking a stroll to soothe the boredom of the backyard: all pictures we imagine belong to the countryside. Indeed, there is not really a city centre in the European sense – i.e. a comprehensive city planning, where monuments, squares, parks etc. are related to each other with avenues and a more or less coherent architecture. Instead, mosques and other monuments often seem to emerge out of the ”nowhere” that is the dense organic maze of streets, houses and courtyards.
Friendly and informal, in the way that people do not seem to have been infected with the arrogance and self-absorbedness that often comes with being the biggest and the best. The village-scale of many districts is welcoming in itself and not once did I have a feeling of insecurity, be it in the crowded bazaar area or in a dim-lit back street.
To conclude, our journey to Istanbul was a very interesting and thoroughly enjoyable experience, owing much to the preparations done by our guides br. Björn and br. Claudio, our dominican host. Thank you!”
Benoît

“An eclectic landscape, whose single guiding line seems to be drawn by the mosques, a society with a composite face, mosaic of cultures, religions, life stories, cemented by Islam: that is how Istanbul appeared to my eyes. Istanbul has been a meeting point over History. A meeting point…what a wonderful place to meet people!
And the journey was the occasion of several meetings, coming from different origins, each one experienced with a different intensity: first of all the ones that emerged from our group, then the meeting with the town and its inhabitants, and finally the opportunities given by the speakers we met, and who led us into the intimacy of the city.
I would particularly remember my meeting with the Islamic world. I first of all got to know that the mosque, more than a prayer area, is a social place, in times past the centre of a complex, which could include a Koranic school, a hospital, a hammam, shops. I learnt that Islam could be mystical and lead the believer to an intimate relationship to God. During the Friday evening prayers at Eyüp, I got caught by the intensity radiating from this gathering of believers, all members of the same body, all carried by the same dynamic, all breathing as one.
It was an intense and refreshing journey, and coming back does not mean that the journey ends. Connections were made, and I hope to make them bear fruits – Insha’Allah. The impulse that was sprung in Istanbul should encourage us to keep being delighted, to keep our eyes and heart opened in order to let the trip go on!”
Xavier Tourde

Xavier

Filmprogram this Autumn

Hello, our film evenings are interesting events with quality films and discussions afterwords. We gather many different people with different views – both Christians and others. Some ar more familiar with the art of film, others just look in, and hopefully they discover something.
We live in a time of images and there is really too much of them. When we look at film at Sandgatan we therefore choose films carefully – not just entertainment, but something that adds a perpective on life. The discussion afterwards is essential, that the image is accompanied with a word, a reflection- It´s often surprising events, when the eyes of the other, the reflection of the other ,widens the perspective and understanding.
This autumn there are films by Eric Rohmer, Ingemar Bergman   and Jim Jarmusch.
yours br Björn
FILMPROGRAM SANDGATAN 8
Éric Rohmer (1920–2010) might be the archetypical French director: charmful, witty, intellectually intense, talkative. A part of the New Wave scene, Rohmer was impressingly consistent over his vital 60 years of production. His output is manifold. His films can be seen as delightful trifles, but to its core, Rohmer’s work leaps through mazes of human psychology, especially the intricate verbal games people play when trying to justify their desires. Inside often lures a moral conundrum, e.g. in our first Rohmer film.
Jim Jarmusch, American film director, is a champion of independent cinema who broke Hooywood conventions with his highly inventive narratives, deadpan humour and endearing character studies. He has created some of the most original, amusing and sublime landmark movies in underground cinema, in springtime we saw three of them, now we´re back with two others. Concentrating and the small details of daily life, as opposed to the big events, his observational films often reflect a nocturnal subculture.
Ingmar Bergman (1918 – 2007) was by all accounts the greatest Swedish director ever to work in cinema. Through a career spanning almost sixty years, Bergman meticulously documented every facet of the human psyche. His films are sustained meditations on the human condition, whether it be existential angst in the face of mortality and faith, or the difficulties of leading a fulfilling life among our fellow human beings.
Friday 21/9
Film Day – two films and dinner inbetween. Bring things for the table!
4 pm       The Passion of Anna , Ingemar Bergman, Sweden 1969 96 min
A less-known Bergman movie, yet among his most alluring. Andreas Winkelman (played by Bergman favourite Max von Sydow) moves to a barren island, in grief of his recently deceased wife. He befriends his neighbours, the widow Anna (Liv Ullman) and a married couple (Bibi Andersson and Erland Josephson). The island, as well as its inhabitants, keeps many threatening secrets.
7.30 pm   My Night at Maud´s, Eric Rohmer, France 1969, 110 min
…where the Catholic Jean-Louis (played by New Wave favourite Jean-Louis Trintignant) spends a night talking with the Marxist Vidal (Antoine Vitez) and the libertine divorcee Maud (Françoise Fabian) on topics on morality, religion, philosophy, mathematics. Jean-Louis and Maud are finally left on their own…

Sunday 14/10 at 7.15 pm
Chloé at the Afternoon, Eric Rohmer, France 1972, 105 min
The antagonist Frédéric (Bernard Verley) is happily married and expecting a child with his wife. One day, Chloé (played by 60’s and 70’s icon Zouzou) shows up at Frédéric’s office. Frédéric knows Chloé as a femme fatale, the two are acquaintances from the past and they now reshape a friendship. Their meeting makes Frédéric reassess his situation.

Sunday 4/11 at 7.15 pm,
The Virgin Spring , Ingemar Bergman, Sweden 1964, 86 min
Sunday 25/11 at 7.15 pm
Night on Earth, Jim Jarmusch, USA 1992
Night on Earth assembles five moments in time, in taxicabs, in the middle of the night, in five of the world’s cities. At the end, we have learned no great lessons and arrived at no thrilling conclusions, but we have shared the community of the night, when people are unbuttoned and vulnerable – more ready to speak about what’s really on their minds.
Sunday  16/12 at 7.15 pm
Dead Man, Jim Jarmusch, USA 1995
Mixing poetic mysticism, violence and droll comedy, “Dead Man” stars Johnny Depp as Willim Blake, a meek, naive accountant who travels from Cleveland to the godforsaken town of Machine, there to assume a position with the Dickinson Metal Works. That metaphysical context benefits enormously from the haunting musical themes that Neil Young wrote, underlining the film’s psychedelic/apocalyptic edge, and from the stunning black-and-white camera work.